Images of Melagavi (Heraion) Lighthouse at Loutraki, Corinthia, Greece

Image of Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) Lighthouse at Perachora, Loutraki, Greece.

Built in 1897 on the Agrilaos peninsula, the Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) is situated in the golf of Alkyonides Islands at Perachora, Loutraki, Province of Corith; .appr/ ninety-minutes car drive from Athens. The Heraion lighthouse is a rectangular light tower, made of stone with a T-shaped outline. In 1947, the building was renovated and repaired.

Loutraki is a popular seaside summer resort.  The lighthouse is in very close proximity to ancient remnants dating as back as in 6000 BC; more prominent as the remnants of the Heraion of Perachora (Greek: Ηραίο Περαχώρας)

The lighthouse even today remains an active guide to navigation.

Image of Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) Lighthouse at Perachora, Loutraki, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Image of Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) Lighthouse at Perachora, Loutraki, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Image of Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) Lighthouse at Perachora, Loutraki, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Image of Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) Lighthouse at Perachora, Loutraki, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Image of Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) Lighthouse at Perachora, Loutraki, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Image of Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) Lighthouse at Perachora, Loutraki, Greece. A 1,500-dwt general cargo vessel passing by under the watch and the dangerous cliffs of the Agrilaos peninsula. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Image of Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) Lighthouse at Perachora, Loutraki, Greece.  Image credit: Karatzas Images

Image of Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) Lighthouse at Perachora, Loutraki, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Image of Melagavi (Μελαγκἀβη) or Heraion (Ηραἰον) Lighthouse at Perachora, Loutraki, Greece. A close-up. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images. All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS: The purpose of this blog is for entertainment and information purposes. Vessel description(s), if any, is/are provided in good faith and believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Any vessel description(s) is/are provided for entertainment purposes only. We assume no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. To purchase rights or merchandise of high resolutions images and art presented here, please visit www.karatzas.nyc or email < info [at] BMKaratzas.com >. Thank you for the consideration.

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Images of Point Judith Light at Rhode Island

Images of Point Judith Light at Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

We have posted twice in the past images from the Point Judith Light, in 2014 and 2015 and can be found by clicking on the hyperlinks.

High resolution images for sale of Point Judith Light at Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island can be found on our website, Karatzas Images.

Images herebeleow were taken in March 2019:

Images of Point Judith Light on the west side of the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Images of Point Judith Light on the west side of the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Images of Point Judith Light on the west side of the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Images of Point Judith Light on the west side of the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Images of Point Judith Light on the west side of the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Images of Point Judith Light on the west side of the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Images of Point Judith Light on the west side of the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Images of Point Judith Light on the west side of the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Image credit: Karatzas Images

 

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images. All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS: The purpose of this blog is for entertainment and information purposes. Vessel description(s), if any, is/are provided in good faith and believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Any vessel description(s) is/are provided for entertainment purposes only. We assume no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. To purchase rights or merchandise of high resolutions images and art presented here, please visit www.karatzas.nyc or email < info [at] BMKaratzas.com >. Thank you for the consideration.

Images from the Highland Lighthouse (Cape Code Light) in Cape Cod, Massachusetts

The Highland Light (previously known as Cape Cod Light), an active lighthouse on the Cape Cod National Seashore in North Truro, Massachusetts, on the Outer Cape Code, is the oldest and tallest lighthouse on Cape Cod, and the 20th lighthouse built in the USA. It is owned by the National Park Service (a Cape Cod National Seashore property) and cared for by the Highland Museum and Lighthouse, Inc., while the United States Coast Guard operates the light itself. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Highland Light Station.

In 1700, the town of Truro, Massachusetts, nine miles east of Race Point at the tip of Cape Cod, began its history under a different name—one it easily earned: “Dangerfield.” Even in calm weather, fishermen could suddenly find upon approaching land such a swell breaking that they dared not attempt to come ashore.

“I found that it would not do to speak of shipwrecks in the area, for almost every family had lost someone at sea,” Henry David Thoreau would later write about Truro in the December 1864 issue of Atlantic Monthly. “‘Who lives in that house?’ I inquired. ‘Three widows,’ was the reply. The stranger and the inhabitant view the shore with very different eyes. The former may have come to see and admire the ocean in a storm; but the latter looks on it as the scene where his nearest relatives were wrecked.”

Blindingly dense summer fogs lasting till midday that turn (in Thoreau’s words) “one’s beard into a wet napkin about the throat” provide conditions that to this day challenge even the most experienced mariner. The letter Reverend James Freemen wrote petitioning for a lighthouse near Truro stated that in 1794 more vessels were wrecked on the east shore of Truro than in all of Cape Cod.

On May 17th 1796, President George Washington signed the bill, along with $8,000 budget, authorizing a wood lighthouse to warn ships about the dangerous coastline between Cape Ann and Nantucket. It was the first light on Cape Cod, situated on ten acres on the Highlands of North Truro, was usually the first light seen when approaching the entrance of Massachusetts Bay from Europe.

The nation’s first eclipser was installed in the lantern room to differentiate Highland Light from others on the way to Boston, but delays in receiving it pushed the inaugural illumination back to January 15, 1798. With a focal plane of 180 feet above the sea, the light, with its array of lamps and reflectors, had the potential to be seen up to twenty-four miles, but the haze that often hung over the cape reduced the light’s visibility. Sperm whale oil was initially used in the light, but the fuel was later changed to lard.

In 1833, the wood structure was replaced by brick and in 1840 a new lantern and lighting apparatus was installed. In 1857 the lighthouse was declared dangerous and demolished, and for a total cost of $17,000, the current 66 foot brick tower was constructed, with a first order Fresnel lens from Paris. Along with the lighthouse, there was a keeper’s building and a generator shed, both of which can still be seen today.

In 1854, $25,000 was budgeted to rebuild Cape Cod Lighthouse on a proper site and to fit it with the “best approved illuminating apparatus to serve as substitution for three lights at Nauset Beach.”

Construction did not begin until 1856 on a new sixty-six-foot tower and a dwelling for the head keeper and a double-dwelling for his two assistants. The lighthouse was completed in October 1857, for $17,000, which included a new first-order Fresnel lens that produced a fixed white light. Before the addition of the first-order lens, the station had employed just one keeper. The sixty-nine winding steps leading to the lantern room could be quite tricky for man.
In 1873, $5,000 was allocated for the station to receive a first-class Daboll trumpet fog horn that gave blasts of eight seconds, with intervals between them of thirty seconds. A frame engine-house, measuring twelve feet by twenty-four feet, was built for the fog signal along with a fuel shed.

At the turn of the nineteenth century, duplicate four-horsepower oil engines with compressors replaced the old caloric engines, reducing the time needed to produce the first blast of the fog signal from forty-five to ten minutes. In 1929, an electrically operated air oscillator fog signal was installed at the station as mariners complained that the old reed horns could hardly be heard above the heavy surf crashing on the beach below the station. Power for operating the new signal was furnished by a direct-current generator, driven by a four-cycle, internal-combustion engine that ran on kerosene.

On June 6, 1900, Congress appropriated $15,000 for changing the light’s characteristic from fixed to flashing. The new Barbier, Benard & Turenne first-order Fresnel lens had four panels of 0.92 meter focal distance, revolved in mercury, and gave, every five seconds, flashes of about 192,000 candlepower nearly one-half second in duration. While the new lens was being installed, the light from a third-order lens was exhibited atop a temporary tower erected near the lighthouse. After the new light was exhibited on October 10, 1901, the temporary tower was sold at auction.

In 1946, the Fresnel lens was replaced with a Crouse-Hinds, double-drum, rotating DCB-36 aerobeacon, which was in turn replaced during the automation process in 1987 with a Crouse-Hinds DCB-224 rotating beacon. The Fresnel lens was mostly destroyed during its removal, but a piece is on display at the lighthouse.

By the 1960s, the assistant keeper’s double-dwelling and fog horn building had been removed, and Keeper Isaac Small’s original ten acres had shrunk to little more than two. In the early 1990s, erosion seriously threatened the light. While in 1806, the tower had stood 510 feet from the cliff, by 1989, that distance had shrunk to just 128 feet.

Highland Lighthouse attracted visitors even when it was staffed by resident keepers. In 1922, 7,300 people registered at the lighthouse. Highland Museum and Lighthouse, Inc. was formed in 1998 as a non-profit to partner with the National Park Service in running a gift shop in the keeper’s dwelling and in offering tours of the lighthouse. After fifteen years in this role, the non-profit lost its contract due to operational issues, and on January 1, 2014, Eastern National was awarded the contract for operating the lighthouse.
The present location of the lighthouse is not the original site as beach erosion had rendered the original location dangerous. The structure was moved 450 feet (140 m) to the west from the cliff’s edge. The move was undertaken in 1996 at a cost of $1.5 million. The 430-ton structure was successfully moved intact on I-beams greased with Ivory soap.

Formerly a location associated with notable danger, the lighthouse presently is surrounded by an oceanfront golf course, the Highland Golf Course. After an errant golf ball broke a window, they were replaced with unbreakable material. The lighthouse grounds are open year-round on Highland Light Road in Truro, with tours and the museum available by the National Park Service during the summer months.

Highland Light Station is located on Highland Rd. in North Truro. Traveling north on Rte. 6, take the “Cape Cod/Highland Rd.” exit; turn right onto Highland Rd. and follow to the Highland Lighthouse area. Highland Light Station is situated on grounds owned by the National Park Service as part of the Cape Cod National Seashore and is managed by the Truro Historical Society. The grounds are open all year and the lighthouse is open May-October. A trip to the light station allows the visitor to enjoy the Interpretive Center, watch a 10-minute video and climb the lighthouse tower for a small fee. For further information, visit the Truro Historical Society‘s website or call 508-487-1121.

Sources:

Previously posted pictures by Karatzas Images of Lighthouse ‘Highland Light’ can be seen here.

Cape Cod (Highland), MA, LighhouseFriends.com

Maritime History of Massachusetts 

The original (wooden) lighthouse at Highlands, Cape Cod was authorized by America’s first President, George Washington. Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

The original (wooden) lighthouse at Highlands, Cape Cod was authorized by America’s first President, George Washington. Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

The original (wooden) lighthouse at Highlands, Cape Cod was authorized by America’s first President, George Washington. Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

The original (wooden) lighthouse at Highlands, Cape Cod was authorized by America’s first President, George Washington. Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

The original (wooden) lighthouse at Highlands, Cape Cod was authorized by America’s first President, George Washington. Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

The original (wooden) lighthouse at Highlands, Cape Cod was authorized by America’s first President, George Washington. Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion and presently is located in the Highland Gulf Course. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion and presently is located in the Highland Gulf Course. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

The Cape Cod National Seashore facing the Atlantic Ocean; beach erosion is visible. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion and presently is located in the Highland Gulf Course. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

The original (wooden) lighthouse at Highlands, Cape Cod was authorized by America’s first President, George Washington. Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion and presently is located in the Highland Gulf Course. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

The original (wooden) lighthouse at Highlands, Cape Cod was authorized by America’s first President, George Washington. Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion and presently is located in the Highland Gulf Course. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion and presently is located in the Highland Gulf Course. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

The original (wooden) lighthouse at Highlands, Cape Cod was authorized by America’s first President, George Washington. Current (brick-built) lighthouse had to be moved westward inland by 450 ft due to beach erosion. Cape Cod Light (Highland Light) is a majestic sight under any circumstances. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images. All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS: The purpose of this blog is for entertainment and information purposes. Vessel description(s), if any, is/are provided in good faith and believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Any vessel description(s) is/are provided for entertainment purposes only. We assume no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. To purchase rights or merchandise of high resolutions images and art presented here, please visit www.karatzas.nyc or email < info [at] BMKaratzas.com >. Thank you for the consideration.

Images of Mersey Bluff Lighthouse, in Devonport, Tasmania

From the Lighthouses of Australia website, information on The Mersey Bluff Lighthouse:

OPERATION
LOCATION: Latitude 41° 10′ S, Longitude 146° 21’E (Map)
OPERATOR: Australian Maritime Safety Authority
CHARACTER: Group Flashing (4) in 20.0 Seconds
LIGHT SOURCE: 1000 Watt 120v, Tungsten Halogen
POWER SOURCE: 120V DC Battery Bank Charged from 240V Mains Supply
INTENSITY: White: 43,800 cd; Red: 8,700 cd
ELEVATION: 37 Metres
RANGE: White: 17 Nautical Miles; Red: 14 Nautical Miles
HEIGHT: 13 Metres

HISTORY
The Mersey Bluff Lighthouse was established in 1889 and is built of bricks on a stone base. Work on the lighthouse started on October 16 1888, and was completed almost 12 months later on May 28 1889. The original Chance Bros. 4th order dioptric lens was first lit on 2nd August 1889, and used kerosene. The first lighthouse keeper was Mr W. Jacques, transferred from Swan Island. A second house was later built for the assistant keeper. The original lighthouse in 1889 replaced a succession of beacons and obelisks that had formerly stood on the site. It also replaced the earlier Don River light.  In 1910 the original kerosene lamp was converted to acetylene gas which was supplied by a Colt seven-day acetylene generator.

The light was converted to DC electric operation in 1920 and de-manned at the same time. The Lighthouse was converted to hydro electricity with gas standby in 1952, and a 2nd order (700mm) fixed lens was installed. The keepers’ houses were let to local tenants until they were demolished in 1966. In 1978 it was further converted to all electric operation. The lighthouse stands on top of the bluff to western side of the mouth of the Mersey River in Tasmania north of the Port of Devonport.  The establishment of the lighthouse ended a history of wrecks in this area.  The Commonwealth assumed responsibility for the lighthouse under the Commonwealth Lighthouse Act in 1915.  Four vertical red stripers were painted to the lighthouse in 1929 giving it its distinctive and memorable appearance.  It is unusual for an Australian lighthouse to have vertical stripes in its day mark.  Another unusual feature of this light-station is that it was connected to town water in 1901.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

May the Light Be With You!

Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co Wishes You a most Prosperous, Happy New Year!

A traditional and historic means of navigational aids, lighthouses have saved life and property from destruction from nature’s controlling force over human limited power. Built close to treacherous seas and windswept promontories, lighthouses provided visual and acoustic warnings to mariners to impending dangers. Quite often, before automation, lighthouses were manned by light keepers living lives of solitude and sacrifice to ensure that other people were safe. One of the last links to maritime history, lighthouses keep drawing crowds of visitors every year. A sign of hope, a sign of life, a sign of care, a sign of community and inter-dependance, lighthouses have been evocative symbols of mankind conquering nature, of perseverance and resoluteness.

The images in this post were taken in the week between Christmas and New Year in 2017, except for the Highland Light pictures taken in March 2017; the lighthouses are located in the States of Maine, Massachusetts and South Carolina; Maine is approximately 600 miles north of New York and South Carolina and Cape Hatteras approximately 700 miles south of New York. During the time of the shootings, temperatures in Maine were well below freezing; actually at 2 deg F (-16 deg C) at 7am EST on the morning of December 27th; the weather in South Carolina still cold but minimally sub-freezing.

We hope that you enjoy the pictures herewith and we sincerely hope that they bring light and hope and strength and inspiration to you and loved ones, at home and at work, in 2018!

Built in 1847 and standing 88 ft (27m) tall, the Cape Neddick Light (also known as Nubble Light and Cape Neck) is listed in the National Register of Historic Places in the USA. The Voyager spacecraft, which carries photographs of Earth’s most prominent man-made structures and natural features, should it fall into the hands of intelligent extraterrestrials, includes a photo of Nubble Light with images of the Great Wall of China and the Taj Mahal. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 1847 and standing 88 ft (27m) tall, the Cape Neddick Light (also known as Nubble Light and Cape Neck) is listed in the National Register of Historic Places in the USA. The Voyager spacecraft, which carries photographs of Earth’s most prominent man-made structures and natural features, should it fall into the hands of intelligent extraterrestrials, includes a photo of Nubble Light with images of the Great Wall of China and the Taj Mahal. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 1847 and standing 88 ft (27m) tall, the Cape Neddick Light (also known as Nubble Light and Cape Neck) is listed in the National Register of Historic Places in the USA. The Voyager spacecraft, which carries photographs of Earth’s most prominent man-made structures and natural features, should it fall into the hands of intelligent extraterrestrials, includes a photo of Nubble Light with images of the Great Wall of China and the Taj Mahal. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 1847 and standing 88 ft (27m) tall, the Cape Neddick Light (also known as Nubble Light and Cape Neck) is listed in the National Register of Historic Places in the USA. The Voyager spacecraft, which carries photographs of Earth’s most prominent man-made structures and natural features, should it fall into the hands of intelligent extraterrestrials, includes a photo of Nubble Light with images of the Great Wall of China and the Taj Mahal. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Construction began in 1787 under the administration of the first president of the USA George Washington, Portland Head Light, also known as the Cape Elizabeth Lighthouse, is a historic lighthouse in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. The light station sits on a head of land at the entrance of the primary shipping channel into Portland Harbor, which is within Casco Bay in the Gulf of Maine. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Construction began in 1787 under the administration of the first president of the USA George Washington, Portland Head Light, also known as the Cape Elizabeth Lighthouse, is a historic lighthouse in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. The light station sits on a head of land at the entrance of the primary shipping channel into Portland Harbor, which is within Casco Bay in the Gulf of Maine. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Construction began in 1787 under the administration of the first president of the USA George Washington, Portland Head Light, also known as the Cape Elizabeth Lighthouse, is a historic lighthouse in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. The light station sits on a head of land at the entrance of the primary shipping channel into Portland Harbor, which is within Casco Bay in the Gulf of Maine. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Portland Breakwater Light (also called Bug Light) was originally built in 1855. The current structure dates back to 1875 and is made of curved cast-iron plates whose seams are disguised by six decorative Corinthian columns. Its design was inspired by the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates in Athens. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Portland Breakwater Light (also called Bug Light) was originally built in 1855. The current structure dates back to 1875 and is made of curved cast-iron plates whose seams are disguised by six decorative Corinthian columns. Its design was inspired by the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates in Athens. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Portland Breakwater Light (also called Bug Light) was originally built in 1855. The current structure dates back to 1875 and is made of curved cast-iron plates whose seams are disguised by six decorative Corinthian columns. Its design was inspired by the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates in Athens. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse is located within Acadia National Park in the southwest portion of Mount Desert Island, Maine, marking the entrance to Bass Harbor and Blue Hill Bay. Originally was constructed in 1858, Today, the keeper’s house is a private residence for a local Coast Guard member and his family. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse is located within Acadia National Park in the southwest portion of Mount Desert Island, Maine, marking the entrance to Bass Harbor and Blue Hill Bay. Originally was constructed in 1858, Today, the keeper’s house is a private residence for a local Coast Guard member and his family. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Fort Point Light, also known as Fort Point Light Station, is located in Fort Point State Park, in Stockton Springs, Maine. The present lighthouse (focal height of 88 ft (27 m)) dates to 1857, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Fort Point Light, also known as Fort Point Light Station, is located in Fort Point State Park, in Stockton Springs, Maine. The present lighthouse (focal height of 88 ft (27 m)) dates to 1857, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Fort Point Light, also known as Fort Point Light Station, is located in Fort Point State Park, in Stockton Springs, Maine. The present lighthouse (focal height of 88 ft (27 m)) dates to 1857, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Highland Light (previously known as Cape Cod Light) is an active lighthouse on the Cape Cod National Seashore in North Truro, Massachusetts. Originally commissioned by the first president of the United States George Washington in 1797, The current tower was erected in 1857. It is the oldest and tallest lighthouse on Cape Cod. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Highland Light (previously known as Cape Cod Light) is an active lighthouse on the Cape Cod National Seashore in North Truro, Massachusetts. Originally commissioned by the first president of the United States George Washington in 1797, The current tower was erected in 1857. It is the oldest and tallest lighthouse on Cape Cod. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Highland Light (previously known as Cape Cod Light) is an active lighthouse on the Cape Cod National Seashore in North Truro, Massachusetts. Originally commissioned by the first president of the United States George Washington in 1797, The current tower was erected in 1857. It is the oldest and tallest lighthouse on Cape Cod. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Cape Hatteras Light is located on Hatteras Island in the Outer Banks in the town of Buxton, North Carolina and is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Standing 210 high (64 m), the lighthouse is beloved for its distinctive coloring and its relocation 0.5km inland in 1999 due to beach erosion. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Cape Hatteras Light is located on Hatteras Island in the Outer Banks in the town of Buxton, North Carolina and is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Standing 210 high (64 m), the lighthouse is beloved for its distinctive coloring and its relocation 0.5km inland in 1999 due to beach erosion. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Cape Hatteras Light is located on Hatteras Island in the Outer Banks in the town of Buxton, North Carolina and is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Standing 210 high (64 m), the lighthouse is beloved for its distinctive coloring and its relocation 0.5km inland in 1999 due to beach erosion. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Cape Hatteras Light is located on Hatteras Island in the Outer Banks in the town of Buxton, North Carolina and is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Standing 210 high (64 m), the lighthouse is beloved for its distinctive coloring and its relocation 0.5km inland in 1999 due to beach erosion. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Bodie Island Lighthouse is located in Bodie Island on the Outer Banks in North Carolina and was built in 1872. It stands 156 feet (48 m) tall and is located on the Roanoke Sound side of the first island that is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The lighthouse is just south of Nags Head, approximately one hour north of the Cape Hatteras Light; note black-and-white horizontal patterns to distinguish from the spiral Cape Hatteras Lighthouse coloring. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Bodie Island Lighthouse is located in Bodie Island on the Outer Banks in North Carolina and was built in 1872. It stands 156 feet (48 m) tall and is located on the Roanoke Sound side of the first island that is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The lighthouse is just south of Nags Head, approximately one hour north of the Cape Hatteras Light; note black-and-white horizontal patterns to distinguish from the spiral Cape Hatteras Lighthouse coloring. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Bodie Island Lighthouse is located in Bodie Island on the Outer Banks in North Carolina and was built in 1872. It stands 156 feet (48 m) tall and is located on the Roanoke Sound side of the first island that is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The lighthouse is just south of Nags Head, approximately one hour north of the Cape Hatteras Light; note black-and-white horizontal patterns to distinguish from the spiral Cape Hatteras Lighthouse coloring. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Currituck Beach Light is located on the Outer Banks in Corolla, North Carolina. The lighthouse is constructed of brick and is not painted in order to be distinguished from the Bodie Island and Cape Hatteras Lights that are in the vicinity. The Currituck Beach Light was added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1973. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Currituck Beach Light is located on the Outer Banks in Corolla, North Carolina. The lighthouse is constructed of brick and is not painted in order to be distinguished from the Bodie Island and Cape Hatteras Lights that are in the vicinity. The Currituck Beach Light was added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1973. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

The Currituck Beach Light is located on the Outer Banks in Corolla, North Carolina. The lighthouse is constructed of brick and is not painted in order to be distinguished from the Bodie Island and Cape Hatteras Lights that are in the vicinity. The Currituck Beach Light was added to the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1973. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Beavertail Lighthouse

Images of Beavertail Lighthouse (Rhode Island)

The present Beavertail Lighthouse was built in 1856,  and still is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island, USA, marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay. The 64-foot (20 m) lighthouse lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island in the town of Jamestown, Rhode Island in Beavertail State Park, on a site where beacons have stood since the early 18th century. The original lighthouse (which was then known as “Newport Light”) was built  of wood in 1749, and was rebuilt in 1753 after a fire destroyed the original structure. The present lighthouse is the third to be built around that location.

The light provides navigation for boats and ships entering Narragansett Bay in the East Passage between Conanicut Island and Newport, Rhode Island on Aquidneck Island. Other lighthouses, such as Castle Hill Lighthouse, Point Judith Light, and Rose Island Light are visible from Beavertail Lighthouse.

Its white light rotates counterclockwise and makes a full rotation in about six seconds. The light is on 24 hours per day; it has a loud foghorn that blasts about every 30 seconds during the fog.

According to the Beavertail Lighthouse Museum Association website, key days in the history of the lighthouse:

1657 – Conanicut Island was purchased from the Narragansett Indians by a group of settlers from Newport.

1712 – The first official request for a permanent navigational aid (a lighthouse) was recorded in the documents of the Newport Town Meeting.

1731 – To raise funds for lighthouse construction, the first tariff was placed on imported and exported cargo passing through Newport (10 shillings per ton foreign; 18 shillings per ton local).

1749 – In February, the following appeared in the Newport Town Record:

“A committee was appointed to build a Lighthouse at Beavertail on the Island of Jamestown, alias Conanicut, as there appears a great necessity for a lighthouse as several misfortunes have happened lately for want of a light.”

Construction of the first lighthouse, the third in the colonies, began in May and ended in September 1749. The lighthouse was constructed of wood.

1753 – The wooden lighthouse was rebuilt after a fire destroyed the original.

1779 – British soldiers retreating from Newport burned the tower and removed the lighting equipment, leaving the beacon darkened for the rest of the Revolution.

1783 – Repair of the lighthouse was completed. United States Congress established its authority over the nation’s twelve lighthouses.

1852United States Lighthouse Board was established, and the agency quickly set about creating a modern lighthouse system.

1856 – A new lighthouse was constructed to replace the deteriorating 1753 structure. The new one measured 10 feet square, and 64 feet to the beacon. The new optic was a third-order Fresnel lens imported from France, a sparkling beehive of glass similar to that now housed in the Museum. The old tower was removed and on its foundation was built a fog-whistle house.

1898 – A dwelling was added to house an assistant keeper, who helped with fog signal duties. This house now serves as the Beavertail Lighthouse Museum.

1938 – The Great Hurricane of 1938 exposed the foundation of the original lighthouse, 100 feet in front of the present light. Hidden by the fog whistle building, it had long been forgotten.

1972 – The beacon was automated, part of a program which in 1989 ended the profession of lighthouse keeping in the United States (except for the Boston Light). Dominic Turillo was the last keeper to serve at Beavertail.

1983 – The Rhode Island Parks Association began restoring the deteriorating Assistant Keeper’s House as a lighthouse museum.

1989 – The Beavertail Lighthouse Museum was opened, the result of a joint effort by the Rhode Island Parks Association, the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, the Town of Jamestown, and the United States Coast Guard.


 

Lighthouse Beavertail 1

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 2

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 3

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 4

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 5

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 6

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 7

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 8

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 9

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 10

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 11

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Beavertail 12

Beavertail Lighthouse, the third in the location and built in 1856, is the premier lighthouse in Rhode Island; marking the entrance to Narragansett Bay, lies on the southernmost point of Conanicut Island. http://www.karatzas.com


© 2013-2015 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Point Judith Light

Images of Point Judith Lighthouse (Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island)

The Point Judith Light is located at the north side of the eastern entrance to Block Island Sound and on the west side of the entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. The confluence of two waterways make this area busy with water traffic and the waters around Point Judith are very cold and dangerous. Historically, even with active lighthouses, there have been many shipwrecks off these coasts.

From the U.S. Coast Guard website:                                                                             Point Judith property was purchased on 25 May, 1809 from Hazard Knowles for the sum of $300.00. Point Judith has often been referred to as the “Cape Hatteras of New England”.

The treacherous waters and rocky shoreline was the scene of many shipwrecks in the 19th century. In an effort to protect mariners, William Ellery, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, established Point Judith Light in 1810. The Lighthouse was built of rough stone and was 35 feet high. The original lighthouse was destroyed in the hurricane of September 1815 and was rebuilt in 1816. To further protect shipping, a life saving station was established in July of 1875. Point Judith Station is the oldest station, on a continuous location, in the Coast Guard Sector Southeastern New England area of operation. It was one of the five original life saving stations that protected shipping on the southern shores surrounding Rhode Island. The station was manned by regularly employed Surfmen and was equipped with lifeboat and breeches buoy apparatus. So successful was this, that a new and larger station was built in 1882 to accommodate newer equipment and a larger crew. In September of 1933, the station was gutted by fire and then replaced with the present building in 1937. The destructive hurricane of 1938 destroyed the boathouse near Breakwater Village. A new boathouse was constructed in 1940 at Galilee. The present light was built in 1857. The tower is octagonal with the upper half painted brown and the lower half painted white. It’s 51 feet above ground and 65 feet above sea level and has a visibility of 16 NM on a clear day. Point Judith was very active during World War II and just two days prior to the end of the war (in Europe) assisted in the rescue of the steam collier “Black Point” which was torpedo four miles off the point.


 

Location Narragansett, Rhode Island
Year first constructed 1810
Year first lit 1857
Automated 1954
Foundation Granite blocks
Construction Granite blocks
Tower shape Octagonal conical
Markings / pattern Lower half, white
upper half, brown
Black lantern
Height 51 feet (16 m)
Focal height 65 feet (20 m)
Original lens Fourth order Fresnel lens
Current lens original
Range 16 nautical miles (30 km; 18 mi)
Characteristic Occulting 3 white 15 seconds
5s on, 2s off; 2s on, 2s off; 2s on, 2s off
Fog signal Horn, 1 blast every 15 seconds
Admiralty number J0628
ARLHS number USA-625
USCG number 1-19450

 

Lighthouse Point Judith 1

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 2

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 3

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 4

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 5

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 6

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 7

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 8

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 9

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 10

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 11

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com

Lighthouse Point Judith 12

Built in 1857, of granite and in octagonal conical shape, with a brown upper and white lower half as distinctive daymark, Point Judith Light marking the west entrance to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. http://www.karatzas.com


 

© 2013-2015 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.