MT ‘FEDOR’

Images of LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ inbound the Houston Ship Channel
70,156 DWT Product Carrier Built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI)

IDENTIFICATION: Ex-name is Nidia. Launch Name was Nidia. Panamax Tanker, Call Sign V7EV9, IMO Number 9259317. Built at Hyundai HI, Double Hull, Marshall Islands Flagged, DNV Classed. DIMENSIONS/TONNAGES: Moulded Depth of 20.40 m., Lightship air draft of 45.00 m., Keel to mast air draft of 52.23 m., Tonnage of 34,208 Panama Canal Net, 42,988 Suez Canal Net, 19,597 International Net and 69,048 Dwt (long). Length Overall of 228.08 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 219.10 m., Draught of 13.70 m., Beam of 32.20 m., 67.83 Tonnes per Centimetre Immersion, Gross Tonnage of 41,397, MAN B. & W. Engine, Speed of 15.70 kts, Heavy Fuel Oil, Horsepower of 18424, Bunker Capacity of 2,038 tonnes.

OWNER / MANAGER DETAILS: Salamon AG, URL: http://www.salamon-ag.de.

VESSEL ADDITIONAL DETAILS: Cargo Capacities of 77,910 cu.m. and 490,000 Barrels, Segregated Ballast Tanks, 12 Tanks, 12 Pumps with a total Capacity of 10,800 cu.m., Epoxy Tank Coating, Heat Exchangers, Maximum heating capacity of 66 degrees Celsius.

ENGINE DETAILS: Engine Description 2 S.A. 6-cyl., Engine Model 6S60MC-C7.1, 1 fixed pitch Propellor. CARGO HANDLING: 6 Cargo Separations, 12 Wing Tanks with a capacity of 77,910 cu.m., 6 Cargo Manifolds, Stern Discharge, Cargo connections have diameters of 16 inches, Manifold height above deck of 2.10 m., Distance from bow to centre manifold is 111.03 m., Maximum operating capacity of cargo pumps is 10,800 t/hr, M/Steel cargo lines. Ballast Capacity of 29,326 tonnes, Solas Certificate, Inert Gas System, Centre Line Bulkhead.

MAIN ENGINE: 1 x Diesel – MAN B. & W. 6S60MC-C7.1 2-stroke 6-cyl. 600mm x 2400mm bore/stroke – 13,560mkW total at 105rpm.

OTHER POWER EQUIPMENT: No Shaft Generator.

PROPULSOR: 1 x FP Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical), 105rpm.

POS, PROPULSOR: No Thrusters.

OTHER ENGINE EQUIPMENT: 1 x Screw Shaft.

LIFTING EQUIPMENT: No Cargo Gear.

SALE & PURCHASE HISTORY: Reported sold to Clients of Salamon on 28 November 2003 for US$ 37m.


 

MT FEDOR 1@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 2@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 3@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Portside bow detail. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 4@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Portside superstructure detail. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 5@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 6@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 7@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 8@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Funnel and House Flag. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 9@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 10@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 11@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 12@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 13@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT FEDOR 14@

LR1 Products Tanker MT ‘Fedor’ (70,000 dwt, built in 2003 at Hyundai Heavy and owned by Salamon AG in Germany) inbound the Houston Ship Channel. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

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MV ‘ANTARES J’

Images of Containership ex-Antares J, presently MV ‘Antala’ in New York Harbor
1,157 TEU Fully Cellular Container Built 2002

IDENTIFICATION: Ex-names are Antares J, Maersk Rotterdam. Launch Name was Antares J/Maersk Rotterdam. Handy Containership, Call Sign V2BF8, IMO Number 9242314. Built at Peene Werft, Antigua & Barbuda Flagged, GL Classed, Ice Strengthened E Class, Length Overall of 155.60 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 148.70 m., Draught of 9.50 m., Beam of 24.50 m., Gross Tonnage of 14,062, Moulded Depth of 14.20 m., Tonnage of 4,958 International Net, 6,053 Light Displacement and 16,909 Dwt (long). ENGINE DETAILS: Engine Description 2 S.A. 7-cyl., Engine Model 7S50MC-C8.1, MAN B. & W. Engine, Speed of 19.00 kts at 38.00 tonnes per day, Heavy Fuel Oil, Horsepower of 15027. 1 Propellor

OWNER / MANAGER DETAILS: Worden, Tom, Schiffahrtskontor GmbH., Oldendorf, Germany; website: http://www.navalis-ship.com. Operators are CMA-CGM.

CARGO HANDLING DETAILS: Teu Capacities of 1,157 Total, 909 Homogeneous and 500 Reefer, Dwt to Teu ratio of 14.85, 2 Crane(s) with a safe working load of 45 tonnes. Total Teu Capacity of 1,157, 2 Crane(s) with a safe working load of 45 tonnes. 250 Reefer Plugs. Crew complement of 19 people.

MAIN ENGINE: 1 x Diesel – MAN B. & W. 7S50MC-C8.1 2-stroke 7-cyl. 500mm x 2000mm bore/stroke – 11,060mkW total at 127rpm.

AUXILIARY: 4 x Aux. Diesel Gen – 4-stroke driving 4 x AC generator(s) at 2,960ekW total, (3,700kVA total), 1 x Emergency Gen – 4-stroke driving 1 x AC generator(s) at 100ekW total, (125kVA total).

PROPULSOR: 1 x FP Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical), 127rpm.

OTHER ENGINE EQUIPMENT: 1 x Boiler, Composite – Aalborg at 9 bar, 2 x Compressor, Air, 1 x Compressor, Air, 1 x Compressor, Air, 1 x Screw Shaft.

LIFTING EQUIPMENT: 2 x Crane SWL 45 tons.

MOORING EQUIPMENT: 3 x Anchor.


 

MV ANTARES J 1@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 2@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 3@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015. Portside bow detail. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 4@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015. Portside stern detail. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 5@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 6@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015; against a glorious Downtown Manhattan and World Trade Center skyline. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 7@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015; against a glorious Downtown Manhattan and World Trade Center skyline. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 8@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015; against a glorious Downtown Manhattan and World Trade Center skyline. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 9@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 10@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 11@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV ANTARES J 12@

Geared handy containership MV ‘Antares J’ (1,500-teu, 2002-built at Peene Werft) entering New York Harbor in August 2015. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

MV ‘AURORA’

Images of Cruiseship MV ‘Aurora’ passing the Statue of Liberty
1,878 Berths Cruise Vessel Built 2000

IDENTIFICATION: Call Sign ZCDW9, IMO Number 9169524.Built at Meyer Werft, Bermuda Flagged, LR Classed, Length Overall of 272.13 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 240.78 m., Draught of 8.40 m., Beam of 32.20 m., Gross Tonnage of 76,152. DIMENSIONS/TONNAGES: Moulded Depth of 11.50 m., Tonnage of 40,370 International Net and 8,352 Dwt (long). Engine Description 4 S.A. 14-cyl., Engine Model 14V48/60, MAN Engine, Speed of 24.00 kts at 150.00 tonnes per day. 2 Propellors.

OWNER / MANAGER DETAILS: P&O Cruises (UK) Ltd, URL: http://www.pocruises.com.

VESSEL DETAILS: Total number of Passengers 1,950, 939 Passenger Cabins, 1878 Passenger Berths, 10 Passenger Decks, 850 Crew.

MAIN ENGINE: 4 x Diesel Gen – MAN 14V48/60 – 4-stroke 14-cyl. 480mm x 600mm bore/stroke 56,000mkW total at 514rpm driving 4 x AC generator(s) at 60Hz.

With appr. 1,800 berths, cruiseship ‘Aurora’ is a medium-size cruiseship with an estimated $375 million construction cost in 2000 at Meyer Wherf in Papenburg, Germany. During her retrofit in 2014, her funnel was painted blue (originally yellow) and the British Union Jack colors were painted on the bow of the vessel. The vessel has been designed and built to appeal and service the British market, and, to that extent, she resembles in many way a traditional ocean liner vessel. 


 

MV AURORA 1@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 2@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 3@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Crossing paths with a water taxi. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 4@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 5@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Bow detail with the Union Jack colors. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 6@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. A newly painted funnel and the house colors. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 7@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. A majestic fall sunset. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 8@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. A majestic fall sunset. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 9@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. A majestic fall sunset. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 10@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Portside bow detail. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 11@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Portside stern detail, with her distinguishing raked, tiered stern. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 12@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 13@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Here comes the Statue of Liberty! Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 14@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Here comes the Statue of Liberty! Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 15@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Here comes the Statue of Liberty! Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 16@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Here comes the Statue of Liberty! Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV AURORA 17@

Cruiseship ‘Aurora’ downstream the Hudson River. Here comes the Statue of Liberty! Image Credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

SS ‘United States’

Images of Steamship SS ‘United States’

The steamship SS ‘United States’ was launched in 1952 in an era of immense optimism after the end of the World War II, when strong rebuilding of the world was taking place. The age of the jet engine was several decades away and the fastest and most glamorous way to cross the Atlantic Ocean was via a steamship liner. Many steamship companies were involved in the trade of bringing immigrants to the US form Europe, but mainly British steamship companies – as one may had expected – were ruling the waves of the Atlantic Ocean and many more seas, with fast, glamorous vessels that would set records for size, speed, luxury and innovation.

The steamship SS ‘United States’ had been the answer of a fast growing country looking to establish its dominance in the world after the World War II; the US had decisively tipped the outcome of WWII, and as a result, its place at the top of the table and its leadership of the world came to be expected.

The story of the steamship SS ‘United States’ is the story of the United Sates coming to prominence on the world scene; from the ‘gestation’ of the design to the time, efforts, dedication and perseverance to be built the vessel one can find a reflection of the history of the United States itself.

The vessel had been the fascination – and some would say the obsession – of one single-minded man, William Francis Gibbs. He started designing the vessel almost two decades before her launch, taking into consideration the latest advances of naval architecture and marine engineering, incorporating advanced standards of safety and luxury, with an eye always to smash the speed record typically set by the British liner vessels. For many reasons, mostly financials and the war circumstances, the vessel could not be built until two decades later. All this time, Mr William Francis Gibbs, brightly kept the hope of the ship alive and kept constantly upgrading and updating the design to incorporate new advancement and ideas.

After the end of World War II, commercial considerations for passengers crossing the Atlantic became more favorable. At the same time, the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) under President Franklin D Roosevelt – probably, the most merchant-marine-ambitious president in the USA history – was aware that should any military flare-ups after WWII should take place in Korea, etc, there would be need to transfer troops fast worldwide; thus, the need of a ‘part time’ / ‘stand by’ fast ship or fleet of ships to position troops. Navigating the bureaucracy in Washington DC was almost as challenging as delivering this miracle of a vessel for Mr Gibbs: 250,000 shaft horsepower, registered 36 knot speed and taking the Blue Riband from RMS ‘Queen Mary’ (actual top speed has been unknown for security reasons, rumored to be more than 45 knots), 4,000-berths, one of the first indoor swimming pools with real sand, onboard theater and stage, tennis court, twenty-two decks (as a comparison MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ – one of today’s biggest cruiseships has ‘only’ eighteen decks), and other amenities. In order for the vessel to be fire-proof, the only piece of wood onboard was the butcher’s block, as even Steinway had to design a special piano for the ship made of aluminum. The vessel cost $78 mil at the time (almost $700 mil in today’s purchasing power), of which 50% was contributed by the US government.

The vessel presently is docked at Pier 82 in Philadelphia waiting for the kindness of strangers from a different era in order to see another day. There have been efforts to save the vessel and convert her to a museum ship or other development that would keep her afloat and preserved for future generations. There have been many promising starts but also heart-breaks over the years… It costs $60,000 per month just to maintain the vessel at her present condition, just for docking and insurance. The vessel is under the management of the SS United States Conservancy, and the non-for-profit foundation faces a drop-dead deadline by the end of this month to find the budget or solution for the vessel; otherwise, the vessel SS ‘United States’ would have the inglorious end of many a ship, the blow torch.

For a vessel so closely associated with the aspiration and dreams of the United States to rule the waves of the world, a vessel so closely associated with the ascend of the United States to the world scene after WWII, it will be a shame for this vessel to be scrapped.

The passage of time is a brutal reminder that everything has an expiration date on our planet, especially for floating structures, but some of such floating structures are just too close to our history, to our tradition, to the baton we eventually will pass to the future generations…

Please consider donating for this worthy cause at the website of the SS United States Conservancy website.

Images of the SS ‘United States’ were taken in March 2014 when we had the fortunate opportunity to visit the vessel.

Additional information about the history of the vessel and images can be found at our previous post.


 

SS UNITED STATES 1@

SS ‘United States’ – Portside hull view, forward. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 2@

SS ‘United States’ – Portside view, aft. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 3@

SS ‘United States’ – View of the stern, vessel home-ported in New York, a rather rare view these days. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 4@

SS ‘United States’ – View of the stern, vessel home-ported in New York, a rather rare view these days. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 5@

SS ‘United States’ – Portside view of the bow. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 6@

SS ‘United States’ – Portside vide of the hull, looking aft. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 7@

SS ‘United States’ – Portside partial view of a sharp bow. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 8@

SS ‘United States’ – a glorious name that may be a life saver… Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 9@

SS ‘United States’ – View of the stern, partial. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 10@

SS ‘United States’ – View of the stern, vessel home-ported in New York, a rather rare view these days. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 12@

SS ‘United States’ – View of the bridge today from the bow. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 11@

SS ‘United States’ – Where first class staterooms used to be… Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 13@

SS ‘United States’ – the look-out tower, forward of the fore funnel. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 14@

SS ‘United States’ – Look-out tower. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 15@

SS ‘United States’ – A ship with a glorious pedigree. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 16@

SS ‘United States’ – Looking aft. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 17@

SS ‘United States’ – Look-out tower and fore funnel. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 18@

SS ‘United States’ – Two faded funnels… Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 19@

SS ‘United States’ – Look-out and communications tower. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 20@

SS ‘United States’ – Looking aft. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 20@

SS ‘United States’ – Looking aft. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 21@

SS ‘United States’ – Looking fore. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 22@

SS ‘United States’ – Looking fore with view of the funnels and the spare propeller onboard. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 23@

SS ‘United States’ – Looking fore, where tennis court used to be. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

SS UNITED STATES 24@

SS ‘United States’ – where tennis court used to be. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

MV ‘NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY’ (Part II)

Images of Cruiseship MV ‘NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY’ departing New York City      Pictures taken during an August-2015 port call                                                    (4,028 Berths, Cruiseship Vessel, Built 2013 at Meyer Werft, Germany)

Images of MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ from previous port call in New York City (August 2014) can be found at another posting, by clicking here!

IDENTIFICATION: Launch Name was Norwegian Breakaway. Call Sign C6ZJ3, IMO Number 9606912. Built at Meyer Werft, Bahamas Flagged, DNV Classed, Length Overall of 325.64 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 300.12 m., Draught of 8.60 m., Beam of 39.70 m., Gross Tonnage of 145,655, Moulded Depth of 11.40 m., Tonnage of 132,549 International Net and 10,826 Dwt (long). ENGINE DETAILS: Engine Description 4 S.A. 14-cyl., Engine Model 14V48/60CR MAN Engine, Speed of 22.00 kts, Horsepower of 84,801B at 514. 2 Propellors, 3 Bow Thruster(s).

OWNER / MANAGER DETAILS: Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL); company website: http://www.ncl.com.

SPECIALIZED DETAILS: Total number of Passengers 4,028, 4028 Passenger Berths, 1595 Crew.

MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ flies the Bahamian flag but she’s home-ported at New York City and the New York City Passenger Ship Terminal in Manhattan. Typically the vessel departs New York every Sunday for seven-day cruises to Bermuda, and thus the evocative name. At almost 326 meter length (1,069 ft) and eighteen decks, she’s presently the ninth largest cruiseship in the world.  Until this year, MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ and her sistership MV ‘Norwegian Getaway’ (of the ‘Breakaway Class’), were the biggest vessels in the Norwegian Cruise Line’s fleet.

At the time of her delivery, it was posted: “Designed as “New York’s” ship, “NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY will bring the best of NYC to sea when she arrives to her year-round homeport in early May 2013, offering the high-caliber dining and entertainment options that New York is known for worldwide. To date, the company has revealed the ship’s groundbreaking design, including an open-air boardwalk, The Waterfront, and 678 Ocean Place; a wide range of indoor and outdoor venues on three dynamic decks that will create a whole new complex at sea that enhances guests’ connection with the ocean.  Norwegian Breakaway’s entertainment will include three Broadway shows: five-time Tony nominated ROCK OF AGES; the dance sensation BURN THE FLOOR; and CIRQUE DREAMS & DINNER JUNGLE FANTASY.  The famed comedy troupe The Second City, Howl at the Moon dueling pianos, and New York’s own Slam Allen will perform on the vessel. Norwegian Breakaway will also feature an exciting fireworks show on every cruise that will dazzle guests on the second to last night at sea each week, and will be the grand finale of a decadent 1980s-themed deck party.”


 

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 1@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 2@ W CELEBRITY SUMMIT

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. One World Trade Center and Lower Manhattan skyline visible. Cruiseship ‘Celebrity Summit’ can be seen sailing upstream. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 3@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Bridge can be seen aft of the vessel. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 4@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 5@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 6@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 7@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 8@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 9@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 10@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 11@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 12@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

MV NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY 13@

Built in 2013 at Meyer Werft and capable to accommodate more than 4,000 passengers (in 2,014 cabins), cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Breakaway’ departs New York City. Panoramic view of Lower Manhattan. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime.


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

MV ‘CAP HUDSON’

Images of Panamax Containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ in New York Harbor        4,255 TEU Fully Cellular Container Built 2009

IDENTIFICATION: Ex-names are CPO Savannah, UASC Shuaiba. Launch Name was UASC Shuaiba. Panamax Containership, Call Sign A8UL4, IMO Number 9440837.Built at Hyundai HI, Liberia Flagged, GL Classed, Length Overall of 262.00 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 248.70 m., Draught of 12.50 m., Beam of 32.20 m., Gross Tonnage of 41,358, Moulded Depth of 19.50 m., Tonnage of 24,234 International Net and 50,928 Dwt (long). ENGINE DETAILS: Engine Description 2 S.A. 8-cyl., Engine Model 8RTA82 Wartsila Engine, Speed of 24.00 kts at 130.00 tonnes per day, Heavy Fuel Oil, Horsepower of 49163. 1 Propellor, 1 Bow Thruster(s) of 1500.00.

OWNER / MANAGER DETAILS: Reederei Claus-Peter Offen, website: http://www.offenship.de. Operators are Hamburg-Sud.

CARGO HANDLING DETAILS: Teu Capacities of 4,255 Total, 2,811 Homogeneous and 1,120 Reefer, Dwt to Teu ratio of 12.16. Total Teu Capacity of 4,255. Crew complement of 22 people,  CARGO HANDLING: 560 Reefer Plugs.

MAIN ENGINE: 1 x Diesel – Wartsila 8RTA82 2-stroke 8-cyl. 820mm x 2646mm bore/stroke – 36,160mkW total at 102rpm.

AUXILIARY: 2 x Aux. Diesel Gen – Himsen 8H25/33 – 4-stroke 8-cyl. 250mm x 330mm bore/stroke 4,800mkW total at 900rpm driving 2 x AC generator(s) at 4,500ekW total, (5,625kVA total) 450V at 60Hz, 2 x Aux. Diesel Gen – Himsen 6H25/33 – 4-stroke 6-cyl. 250mm x 330mm bore/stroke 3,600mkW total at 900rpm driving 2 x AC generator(s) at 3,380ekW total, (4,225kVA total) 450V at 60Hz, 1 x Emergency Gen – 4-stroke driving 1 x AC generator(s) at 150ekW total, (187.50kVA total) 450V at 60Hz.

PROPULSOR: 1 x FP Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical), 102rpm.

POS, PROPULSOR: 1 x Pos, Tunnel Thruster (Fwd.) (electric) (Bronze) at 1,500ekW total, 450V AC.

OTHER ENGINE EQUIPMENT: 1 x Boiler, Oil Fired – Alfa Laval – 26.87 m2 at 9 bar, 1 x Boiler, Exhaust Gas Heated – Alfa Laval – 172m2 at 9 bar, 1 x Screw Shaft.

CARGO EQUIPMENT: 372 x Sockets, Reefer – (Deck) 440V at 60Hz, 3-phase, 32A, 188 x Sockets, Reefer – (Hold) 440V at 60Hz, 3-phase, 32A, 1 x Loading Instrument – Seacos MACS3.

LIFTING EQUIPMENT: No Cargo Gear.

PASSENGER EQUIPMENT: 1 x Elevator, Passenger – Hyundai Elevator.


 

MV CAP HUDSON 1@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Starboard bow view. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 2@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Starboard bow view. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 3@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 4@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 5@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. View of the accommodation. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 6@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Against lower Manhattan skyline. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 7@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Starboard stern view detail. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 8@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 9@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 10@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 11@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Lower Manhattan skyline in the background. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MV CAP HUDSON 12@

Built in 2009 at Hyundai Heavy Industries, panamax containership MV ‘Cap Hudson’ departing New York Harbor; (4,300 teu, 2009, Hyundai Heavy). Is this an asset class under the danger of extinction? Definitely under-valued and under-appreciated at present. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.

MT ‘NING HAI WAN’

Images of MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’, Asphalt and Bitumen Tanker in New York Harbor 6,115 DWT Asphalt & Bitumen Carrier Built 2010

IDENTIFICATION: Launch Name was ‘Ning Hai Wan’. Call Sign 3FNA, IMO Number 9578385. Built at Guangzhou Huangpu, Double Hull, Panama Flagged, China Classed, Length Overall of 106.99 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 101.50 m., Draught of 6.20 m., Beam of 17.60 m., Gross Tonnage of 5,565, Moulded Depth of 10.10 m., Tonnage of 1,669 International Net and 6,018 Dwt (long). ENGINE DETAILS: Engine Description 4 S.A. 9-cyl., Engine Model 9L26, Wartsila Engine, Horsepower of 4156.

OWNER / MANAGER DETAILS: COSCO Southern Asphalt Ltd., website: http://www.coscogz.com.cn/en/shipping/hangyun_nflq.asp

MAIN ENGINE: 1 x Diesel – Wartsila 9L26 4-stroke 9-cyl. 260mm x 320mm bore/stroke – 3,060mkW total at 1,000rpm.

AUXILIARY: 3 x Aux. Diesel Gen – 4-stroke 1,200mkW total driving 3 x AC generator(s) 450V at 60Hz.

PROPULSOR: 1 x Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical).

OTHER ENGINE EQUIPMENT: 1 x Gearbox, Engine.


 

MT NING HAI WAN 1@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Partial view of the stern of outbound cruiseship MV ‘Norvegian Breakaway’. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 2@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 3@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 4@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 6@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 6@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Portside bow stern detail. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 7@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Portside superstructure detail. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 8@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 9@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Against the lower Manhattan skyline and the World Trade Center. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 11@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Full portside view. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 12@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Portiside view of stern and superstructure. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 13@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. Port side partial view with Bayonne Bridge in the background. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime

MT NING HAI WAN 14@

Cosco’s asphalt tanker carrier MT ‘Ning Hai Wan’ (6,000 dwt, built at Guangzhou Huangpu in 2010) inbound New York Harbor. World Trade Center in the background. Image credit: Karatzas Photographie Maritime


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images posted on this blog are typically minimally processed gpeg images of lower resolution. Original images are typically shot in RAW format, which can be provided upon special request.