Images of Containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ in the MIssissippi River

MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ Sailing upstream in the Mississippi River                  Fully Cellular Neo-panamax Containership, 8,450-teu, built in 2006

VESSSEL DESCRIPTION / IDENTIFICATION: IMO Number 9299795, Launch Name was CMA CGM Traviata. Call Sign FMFT, IMO Number 9299795, Hull Number S254. Built at Hyundai Samho HI delivered in Mar 2006, Registered International Francais Flagged, BV Classed, Length Overall of 335.00 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 314.71 m., Draught of 14.52 m., Moulded Depth of 24.60 m., Beam of 42.80 m., Gross Tonnage of 91,410, Tonnage of 48,921 International Net and 100,210 Dwt (long).

VESSEL’S OWNERS & MANAGERS: CMA CGM SA, France. Technical Manager: CMA Ships, France. Operator: CMA CGM SA, France. Registered Owner: Snc Fenice Bail 2, France.

CARGO HANDLING DETAILS: Teu Capacities of 8,448 Total, 6,310 Homogeneous and 1,400 Reefer, 9 Holds, Ship is able to transit the neo-Panamax locks of the Panama Canal based on current official dimension restrictions, but is not able to transit the old locks. Total Teu Capacity of 8,450.

POWER & PROPULSION:
MAIN ENGINE: 1 x Diesel – MAN B. & W. 12K98MC6.1 – 2-stroke 12-cyl. 980mm x2660mm bore/stroke 68,655mkW total at 94rpm.
AUXILIARY: 3 x Aux. Diesel Gen. – MAN Energy Solutions 7L27/38 – 4-stroke 7-cyl. 270mm x 380mm bore/stroke 6,930mkW total at 720rpm driving 3 x Hyundai Electric AC generator(s) at 6,654ekW total, (8,319kVA total) 450V at 60Hz. 2 x Aux. Diesel Gen. – MAN Energy Solutions 9L27/38 – 4-stroke 9-cyl. 270mm x 380mm bore/stroke 5,940mkW total at 720rpm driving 2 x Hyundai Electric AC generator(s) at 5,682ekW total, (7,102kVA total) 450V at 60Hz.
PROPULSOR: 1 x FP Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical), 94rpm.
OTHER ENGINE EQUIPMENT: 1 x Screw Shaft.
CARGO EQUIPMENT: 700 x Sockets, Reefer – .
ENVIRONMENTAL EQUIPMENT: 1 x BWTS – Ballast Water Treatment System – Bio-UV BIO-Sea® at 1000cu.m/hr – 2021 installation year.
BOILER EQUIPMENT: 1 x Boiler, Oil/Gas fired – Aalborg – Mission™ OS 40.14 m2 at 10 bar. 1 x Boiler, Exhaust Heated – Aalborg AQ-2 – 736m2 at 10 bar.
EMERGENCY: 1 x Emergency Diesel Gen. – Cummins Inc4-stroke 600mkW total at 1,800rpm driving 1 x Cummins Inc AC generator(s) at 500ekW total, (625kVA total) 450V at 60Hz.

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

Homeported in Marseilles, France, neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM La Traviata’ sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in fall 2019, en route to New Orleans. Built in 2006 at Hyundai Heavy Industries (Samho). Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images. All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS: The purpose of this blog is for entertainment and information purposes. Vessel description(s), if any, is/are provided in good faith and believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Any vessel description(s) is/are provided for entertainment purposes only. We assume no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. To purchase rights or merchandise of high resolutions images and art presented here, please visit www.karatzas.nyc or email < info [at] BMKaratzas.com >. Thank you for the consideration.

Images of MV ‘ND Maritsa’ Sailing Downstream the Mississippi River

Images of Vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ in the Mississippi River
Ultramax Drybulk Vessel 61,270 DWT, built in 2016

VESSEL’S IDENTIFICATION & DESCRIPTION: Ex-name is Loch Ness, Call Sign V7A2538, IMO Number 9788679, Hull Number 3668. Built at SHIN KURUSHIMA TOYOHASHI SHIPBUILDING CO., LTD., delivered in May 2016, Marshall Islands Flagged, NKK Classed (NS*(CSR, BC-A, BC-XII, GRAB 20, EQ C DG, PSPC-WBT)(ESP)
MNS*) , P&I insurance with Standard Club P&I, Length Overall of 199.90 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 196.50 m., Draught of 13.00 m., Moulded Depth of 18.70 m., , Beam of 32.25 m., 60.14 Tonnes per Centimeter Immersion, Gross Tonnage of 35,025, Tonnage of 29,008 Panama Canal Net, 32,240 Suez Canal Net, 19,844 International Net and 60,304 Dwt (long)., Design SKDY 61K by Shin Kurushima Group, MAN B. & W. Engine, Speed of 14.00 kts at 28.20 tonnes per day, Heavy Fuel Oil (IFO 380), Horsepower of 10,714, Power Type: Diesel 2-Stroke, BWTS (Fitted), Eco – Electronic Engine Modern.

VESSEL’S MANAGERS / OWNERS: Neptune Dry Management Co, Piraeus, Greece.
Technical Manager: Neptune Dry Management Co, Piraeus, Greece.
Operator: Neptune Dry Management Co, Piraeus, Greece. Registered Owner: THETIS SHIPOWNING COMPANY LIMITED

CARGO CAPACITIES & HANDLING: Grain Capacity of 77,475 cu.m., Bale Capacity of 74,270 cu.m., 5 Holds, 5 Hatches, Strengthened for Heavy Cargo, 4 Crane(s) with a safe working load of 30.7 tonnes, Grab Fitted,, Hatch Dimensions are 1 @ 23.52 x 19.20 m., 1 @ 23.52 x 19.20 m., 1 @ 23.52 x 19.20 m., 1 @ 23.52 x 19.20 m., 1 @ 17.64 x 19.20 m.. BWTS – Ballast Water Treatment System – JFE Engineering BallastAce® 2000×1-L at 2000cu.m/hr.

POWER PLANT & PROPULSION:
MAIN ENGINE: 1 x Diesel – MAN B. & W. 6S50ME-B9.3 – 2-stroke 6-cyl. 500mm x2214mm bore/stroke 7,880mkW total at 99rpm.
AUXILIARIES: 3 x Aux. Diesel Gen. – Yanmar 6EY18ALW – 4-stroke 6-cyl. 180mm x 280mm bore/stroke 2,400mkW total at 900rpm driving 3 x AC generator(s) at 60Hz.
PROPULSOR: 1 x FP Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical).
OTHER ENGINE EQUIPMENT: 1 x Screw Shaft.
ENVIRONMENTAL EQUIPMENT 1 x BWTS – Ballast Water Treatment System – JFE Engineering BallastAce® 2000×1-L at 2000cu.m/hr.
LIFTING EQUIPMENT: 4 x Crane – MacGregor (Centreline) SWL 30.70 tons.
EMERGENCY: 1 x Emergency Diesel Gen. – Deutz TCD914L06M – 4-stroke 6-cyl. 102mm x 132mm bore/stroke 129mkW total at 1,800rpm driving 1 x AC generator(s) at 60Hz.

SALE & PURCHASE HISTORY: Reported sold to Greek interests in May 2019 at US$ 23 million.

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Detail of the accommodation, superstructure and stern. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Detail of bow and bow wave. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden  condition. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Ultramax vessel MV ‘ND Maritsa’ pictured sailing downstream in the Mississippi River in laden condition. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images. All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS: The purpose of this blog is for entertainment and information purposes. Vessel description(s), if any, is/are provided in good faith and believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Any vessel description(s) is/are provided for entertainment purposes only. We assume no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. To purchase rights or merchandise of high resolutions images and art presented here, please visit www.karatzas.nyc or email < info [at] BMKaratzas.com >. Thank you for the consideration.

Images of Jones Act Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ in the Mississippi River

Jones Act Products & Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’
Built 2017 at AKER Philly Shipyard, 49,800 DWT

VESSEL IDENTIFICATION & DESCRIPTION: Launch Name was American Pride. Handy Tanker, Call Sign KAPD, IMO Number 9763863, Hull Number 28. Built at Philly Shipyard delivered in Nov 2017, Double Hull, United States Flagged, ABS Classed, P&I insurance with Steamship Mutual P&I, Length Overall of 183.33 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 174.00 m., Draught of 13.01 m., Moulded Depth of 19.10 m., Beam of 32.20 m., Lightship air draft of 41.80 m., Keel to mast air draft of 48.30 m., 52.50 Tonnes per Centimeter Immersion, Gross Tonnage of 29,708, Tonnage of 24,737 Panama Canal Net, 27,469 Suez Canal Net, 14,103 International Net, 10,551 Light Displacement and 49,041 Dwt (long)., MAN B. & W. Engine, Speed of 14.50 kts,

VESSEL’S MANGERS / OWNERS: American Petroleum Tankers LLC. American Petroleum Tankers LLC is a group company of Kinder Morgan. Operator: American Petroleum Tankers LLC. Registered Owner: AMERICAN PETROLEUM TANKERS XI, LLC.

CARGO HANDLING DETAILS: Cargo Capacity of 52,910 cu.m., Segregated Ballast Tanks, 12 Tanks, 12 Pumps, Epoxy Tank Coating, IMO Class 2, 6 Cargo Separations. Closed Loading System, Manifold height above deck of 2.10 m., Distance from bow to centre manifold is 91.10 m., 12 Centrifugal Pump(s), Mild Steel cargo lines, Crude Oil Washing. High Level Alarms, Automatic Ullaging, Inert Gas System, Vapor Return Ashore, Centre Line Bulkhead.

POWER & PROPULSION:
MAIN ENGINE: This equipment is designed to be LNG ready. 1 x Diesel – MAN B. & W. 6S50ME-B9.3 – 2-stroke 6-cyl. 500mm x2000mm bore/stroke 8,058mkW total at 99rpm.
AUXILIARIES: 3 x Aux. Diesel Gen. – MaK4-stroke driving 3 x Marelli ac generator(s) at 2,400ekW total, (3,000kVA total).
PROPULSOR: 1 x FP Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical) (Bronze), HHI-EMD (HiMSEN), 99rpm.
OTHER ENGINE EQUIPMENT: 1 x Screw Shaft.
ENVIRONMENTAL EQUIPMENT: 2 x BWTS – Ballast Water Treatment System – PANASIA Glo-En™ P750. 1 x BWTS – Ballast Water Treatment System – PANASIA Glo-En™ P350.
LIFTING EQUIPMENT: 1 x Crane, Hose – Dongnam DMC SWL 10 tons, 1 x Gantry, Engine Room – Dongnam DMC SWL 4 tons, 2 x Crane, Provision – Dongnam DMC.
BOILER EQUIPMENT: 1 x Boiler, Oil/Gas fired – Aalborg – Mission™ OL at 9 bar. 1 x Boiler, Exhaust Heated – Aalborg Mission™ OC at 9 bar.

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Evocatively named Jones Act Products / Chemical Tanker MT ‘American Pride’ is seen sailing upstream in the Mississippi River in Port Sulphur; built in 2017 at Aker Philadelphia, is beneficially owned by Kinder Morgan and operated Crowley Maritime; per Karatzas Marine Advisors’ estimate, present FMV at $130 mil. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images. All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS: The purpose of this blog is for entertainment and information purposes. Vessel description(s), if any, is/are provided in good faith and believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Any vessel description(s) is/are provided for entertainment purposes only. We assume no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. To purchase rights or merchandise of high resolutions images and art presented here, please visit www.karatzas.nyc or email < info [at] BMKaratzas.com >. Thank you for the consideration.

Images from Crossing the Corinth Canal in Greece

The Corinth Canal (Greek: Διώρυγα της Κορίνθου) connects the Gulf of Corinth in the west with the Saronic Gulf in the east, which flows in the Aegean Sea. The Canal cuts through the narrow strip of land, the Isthmus of Corinth that connects the Peloponnese peninsula and mainland Greece. The eastern harbor in the Saronic Gulf is called Isthmia while the western harbor is named Poseidonia, after the Olympian god of the Seas, Poseidon.

The Canal has been excavated at sea level, and thus there is no need for canal locks. It is 6.4 kilometers (4 mi) long, and 21.4 meters (70 ft) wide at its base. Construction for the modern Canal started in 1881 with completion in 1893. The Canal is crossed by a railway line, a road and a motorway at a height of about 45 meters (148 ft).

The Canal saves appr. 700-kilometre (430 mi) from circumnavigating the Peloponnese peninsula, and accommodates appr. 11,000 ship passages per annum. Ships can pass through the canal only one convoy at a time on a one-way system. Larger ships have to be towed by tugs. In October 2019, With over 900 passengers on board, the 22.5 meters (74 ft) wide and 195 meters (640 ft) long Fred.Olsen cruise ship successfully traversed the canal to set a new record for longest ship to pass through the Canal.

The Corinth Canal is managed today by the Ανώνυμη Εταιρεία Διώρυγας Κορίνθου (Α.Ε.ΔΙ.Κ) (Société Anonyme of the Corinth Canal), and we are grateful to the Canal’s management for the invitation to visit the Canal and its premises and cross the Canal onboard a tug towing a small bulker for the crossing.

History

The construction of the Canal was initially conceived as early as in the 7th century BC by the tyrant of Corinth Periander but the idea was soon abandoned. Instead, Periander constructed a simpler and less costly overland portage road, named the Diolkos or stone carriageway, along which ships could be towed from one side of the isthmus to the other. While Diadoch Demetrius Poliorcetes (336–283 BC) and the Roman Emperors Julius Caesar (100 – 44 BC) and Caligula (12 – 41 AD) considered the construction of the Canal, it was the Roman Emperor Nero (37 – 68 AD) to first physically attempt to construct the canal, personally breaking the ground with a pickaxe and removing the first basket-load of soil in 67 AD; the Canal was dug to a distance of four stades – approximately 700 meters (2,300 ft) by a workforce of 6,000 Jewish prisoners of war – along the course of today’s Canal.  The project was abandoned soon after Nero’s death. A memorial of the attempt in the form of a relief of Hercules was left by Nero’s workers and can still be seen in the canal cutting today.

View from the Gulf of Corinth facing the harbor of Poseidonia, on the west end of the Corinth Canal. Image credit: Karatzas Images

A small dry bulk vessel is towed westbound by one of the Canal’s tugs. Seen here exiting the Canal. Image credit: Karatzas Images

A small dry bulk vessel is towed westbound by one of the Canal’s tugs. Image credit: Karatzas Images

The Roman Emperor Nero was the first to physically attempt digging the Corinth Canal in 67 AD. He died shortly after commencing engineering preparations and excavation operations, but a relief on the rock by the Poseidonia end of the Canal memorializes the vision for future generations and eternity. Image credit: Karatzas Images

A drybuk vessel approaching the Poseidonia end of the Corinth Canal (seen in the background) for its eastbound crossing. Image credit: Karatzas Images

A drybuk vessel approaching the Poseidonia end of the Corinth Canal (seen in the background) for its eastbound crossing. Image credit: Karatzas Images

A drybuk vessel approaching the Poseidonia end of the Corinth Canal (seen in the background) for its eastbound crossing. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Crossing westbound the Corinth Canal with the railway and motorway crossings clearly visible overhead. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Crossing westbound the Corinth Canal with the railway and motorway crossings clearly visible overhead. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Approaching the Corinth Canal at the Isthmia Harbour (east end of Canal, in the Saronic Gulf and Aegean Sea). The pillars for sinking bridge to accommodate the local traffic are clearly visible, as well as the railway and motorway crossings over the Canal. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Approaching the Corinth Canal at the Isthmia Harbour (east end of Canal, in the Saronic Gulf and Aegean Sea). The railway and motorway crossings over the Canal are clearly visible. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Having successfully crossed westbound the Corinth Canal (and having saved appr. twelve hours of sailing time), a small drybulk vessel originating from the Black Sea and destined for the Adriatic Sea, emerges on the west end (Poseidonia) of the Corinth Canal. Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Images. All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS: The purpose of this blog is for entertainment and information purposes. Vessel description(s), if any, is/are provided in good faith and believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Any vessel description(s) is/are provided for entertainment purposes only. We assume no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. To purchase rights or merchandise of high resolutions images and art presented here, please visit www.karatzas.nyc or email < info [at] BMKaratzas.com >. Thank you for the consideration.