Images of MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ in New York Harbor

Images of Neo-panamax Containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ under the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, against the World Trade Center and the Lower Manhattan skyline, and by the Statute of Liberty


It’s been almost a year since the Neo-panamax Containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ called New York Harbor for the first time; we were there then to take pictures of her Maiden Voyage to New York; please click here for our old posting!


Neo-panamax Containership, 14,500-TEU, built in 2017 at Hyundai HI (Ulsan)


VESSEL IDENTIFICATION & DESCRIPTION: Launch Name was CMA CGM Theodore Roosevelt. Call Sign MAZS3, IMO Number 9780873. Built at Hyundai HI (Ulsan), United Kingdom Flagged, BV Classed, Length Overall of 365.95 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 350.00 m., Draught of 16.00 m., Moulded Depth of 29.85 m. Beam of 48.20 m., Gross Tonnage of 140,872, Tonnage of 64,226 International Net and 146,639 Dwt (long). WinGD Engine, Heavy Fuel Oil, Horsepower of 68,195 HP.

SHIPOWNERS & MANAGERS: CMA-CGM SA, Marseille, France.

VESSEL SPECIALIZED DETAILS: Teu Capacities of 14,500 Total, 9,230 Homogeneous and 2,800 Reefer, Ship is able to transit the newly expanded locks of the Panama Canal (Neo-panamax @ 14,000-teu).

MAIN ENGINE: 1 x Diesel – WinGD 10X92 – 2-stroke 10-cyl. 920mm x3468mm bore/stroke 50,190mkW total at 78rpm.

PROPULSION & POSITIONING: 1 x FP Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical) (Bronze), HHI – Hyundai EMD, 78rpm. 2 x Pos, Tunnel Thruster (Fwd.) (electric) at 5,000ekW total.
The neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM Theodore Roosevelt’ is making her maiden voyage to the East Coast of the United States. At 14,500 teu capacity, the vessel belongs to the new asset class of containerships with maximum capacity to cross the expanded locks of the Panama Canal. The call of the containership MV ‘CMA CGM Theodore Roosevelt’ to New York and Port Elizabeth in New Jersey is historic, as she is the largest vessel to pass under the raised Bayonne Bridge and the largest containership to call ever call New York and New Jersey. In June 2017, the 10,000-teu containership MV ‘ZIM Antwerp’ was among the first post-panamax vessels ever having to utilize the bridge’s new airdraft and raised roadway.  In mid-July 2017, the 13,2000-teu containership MV ‘OOCL Berlin’ was the first neo-panamax, and largest boxship until that time, to pass under the Bayonne Bridge. The Bayonne Bridge after almost five years of works, a budgeted cost of $1.3 billion for the project, had her roadway raised by 64 feet in order to allow new-panamax containerships to pass below; new airdraft 219.8 ft, 76.0 m. The Bayonne Bridge connects New Jersey and Staten Island (New York) over the Kill Van Kull Strait.

Here the images are from the containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ passing under the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge (connecting Staten Island and Brooklyn) and photographed against the Lower Manhattan skyline, the World Trade Center and the Statue of Liberty. For those not familiar with the New York region, the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge is the first bridge a ship to encounter when entering the harbor, and effectively almost all vessels calling the port have to pass under. Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge’s airdraft of 230.0  ft (70.1 m) is high enough to be a concern only to large cruiseships calling New York.

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Seen here under the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Seen here under the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Seen here under the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Seen here under the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Amidships detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Seen here against the Lower Manhattan skyline with the World Trade Center clearly visible. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Seen here against the Lower Manhattan skyline with the World Trade Center dominating the scene. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Seen here against the Lower Manhattan skyline with the World Trade Center dominating the scene. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Seen here with the Statue of Liberty. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Neo-panamax containership MV ‘CMA CGM T Roosevelt’ entering the New York Harbor. Seen here with the Statue of Liberty. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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Images of Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ in Piraeus, Greece

MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ Entering the Port of Piraeus
Cruiseship of 2,018 Berths, built in 1998 at Meyer Werft, Germany

VESSEL IDENTIFICATION & DESCRIPTION: Call Sign C6TQ6, IMO Number 9141065. Ordered in 1995 and built at Meyer Werft shipyard in Papenburg, Germany, delivered in Jun 1998, Bahamas Flagged, DNV Classed, P&I insurance with Steamship Mutual P&I, Length Overall of 268.60 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 235.60 m., Draught of 8.40 m., Moulded Depth of 11.50 m., Beam of 32.20 m., Gross Tonnage of 75,338, Tonnage of 45,235 International Net and 8,395 Dwt (long).

The vessel was constructed by Meyer Werft in Germany in 1998 for account of Star Cruises, the Malaysia-based subsidiary of the Genting Group. Her Launch Name was MV ‘SuperStar Leo’ and she was the first vessel of Star Cruises’ Leo-class. Vessel originally home-ported in Singapore and operated for Star Cruises to Malaysia and Thailand. In 2000, Star Cruises acquired Norwegian Caribbean Line; In 2007, Star Cruises sold 50% of Norwegian for $1 billion to US-based Apollo Management (owners of Oceania Cruises).

In 2004, Norwegian Cruise Line was planning to launch the cruiseship MV ‘Pride of America’. However, just prior to completion, the vessel partially sank when a storm hit the Lloyd Werft shipyards. To meet the already booked cruises for MV ‘Pride of America’, the cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Sky’ was immediately rushed into service under the name MV ‘Pride of Aloha’. To compensate for the unexpected events, cruiseship MV ‘SuperStar Leo’ was immediately transferred to the NCL fleet, her planned cruises cancelled, and after only two weeks of refits, the vessel emerged as the cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’, ready to assume the planned cruises of MV ‘Norwegian Sky’.

There is only one sistership vessel built under the ‘Leo Class’ (now ’Spirit Class’ with NCL), the cruiseship MV ’SuperStar Virgo’ which is owned by Star Cruises. Since the ‘Leo Class’ vessels were designed for the Asian market, this cruiseship is generally on a shorter scale in height than most cruise ships. This also means shorter deck chairs for lounging, hand rails in the corridors and so on.

VESSEL’S OWNERS / MANAGERS: Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL), United States. [Norwegian is a publicly traded company listed on the New York Stock Exchange, with major shareholders including Apollo Global Management (15.8%), Genting Group (11.1%), and TPG Capital (2.3%). Norwegian Cruise Line controls approximately 8% of the total worldwide share of the cruise market.]

PASSENGER CAPACITY: Total number of Passengers 2,300, 983 Passenger Cabins, 2018 Passenger Berths, 959 Crew. 14 decks.

MAIN ENGINE: 4 x Diesel Gen – MAN Energy Solutions 14V48/60 – 4-stroke 14-cyl. 480mm x 600mm bore/stroke 58,796mkW total at 514rpm driving 4 x AC generator(s) at 60Hz.

PROPULSOR: 2 x Azimuth (Aft) (electric) AC.

NEWBUILDING COST: Reported newbuilding price of US$ 350 million, contracted in 1995.


Images of Norwegian Cruise Line cruiseships posted previously on our blog, mostly from their port calls to New York Cruise Terminal and in Piraeus can be accessed by clicking on following link!


Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. A pilot boat outbound. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Cruiseship MV ‘Norwegian Spirit’ entering the Port of Piraeus, Greece. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images of Self-Unloader MV ‘Acacia’ in the Port of Melbourne

Images of MV ‘Acacia’ Discharging Cement in the Port of Melbourne
Self-unloading Drybulk Vessel 40,750 DWT built in 1981

VESSEL IDENTIFICATION & DESCRIPTION: Ex-names are CSL Thevenard, Seaway, Seaway L., Pacific Ocean, Seaway L, Seaway, Polystar. Handymax Bulker, Call Sign C6DJ5, IMO Number 7926150, Vessel was rebuilt or converted in 2008. Built at Mitsui SB (Chiba) delivered in Mar 1981, Bahamas Flagged, LR Classed, Length Overall of 184.50 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 178.00 m., Draught of 12.80 m., Beam of 32.20 m., 62.60 Tonnes per Centimetre Immersion, Gross Tonnage of 30,909, MAN B. & W. Engine, Speed of 14.60 kts at 45.50 tonnes per day, IFO 380, Horsepower of 18,400, Bunker Capacity of 3,891 IFO 380.

VESSELS’ OWNERS / MANAGERS: Canada Steamship Lines Group Inc, Province of Quebec, Canada. Technical Manager: CSL Australia Ltd, Australia.

CARGO HANDLING DETAILS: Grain Capacity of 45,045 cu.m., 4 Holds, 4 Hatches. Detailed Vessel Description from the Vessel Manager’s website.

MAIN ENGINE:  1 x Diesel – MAN B. & W. 6L80GFCA – 2-stroke 6-cyl. 800mm x1950mm bore/stroke 13,533mkW total at 106rpm.

AUXILIARY:  3 x Aux. Diesel Gen – 4-stroke driving 3 x AC generator(s) at 2,700ekW total, (3,375kVA total) 450V at 60Hz.

PROPULSION:  1 x FP Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical), 106rpm.

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Here seen framed by the main span of the Bolte Bridge over the Yarra River. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Detailed view of the bow and the telescopic discharge boom. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Accommodation and superstructure reflected on the calm waters of the Yarra River. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Detail view of the bow and partial view of the telescopic discharge boom. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Seen reflected on the calm winter waters of the Yarra River. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Seen reflected on the calm winter waters of the Yarra River. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. View of the superstructure, accommodation and smokestack.Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. View of the superstructure, accommodation and smokestack.Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. View of the smokestack painted with the house colors. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. View of the accommodation. Image credit: Karatzas Images

CSL’s self-unloading drybulk vessel MV ‘Acacia’ pictured unloading cement in the Port of Melbourne, Australia. View of the superstructure, accommodation and smokestack. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images of Mersey Bluff Lighthouse, in Devonport, Tasmania

From the Lighthouses of Australia website, information on The Mersey Bluff Lighthouse:

OPERATION
LOCATION: Latitude 41° 10′ S, Longitude 146° 21’E (Map)
OPERATOR: Australian Maritime Safety Authority
CHARACTER: Group Flashing (4) in 20.0 Seconds
LIGHT SOURCE: 1000 Watt 120v, Tungsten Halogen
POWER SOURCE: 120V DC Battery Bank Charged from 240V Mains Supply
INTENSITY: White: 43,800 cd; Red: 8,700 cd
ELEVATION: 37 Metres
RANGE: White: 17 Nautical Miles; Red: 14 Nautical Miles
HEIGHT: 13 Metres

HISTORY
The Mersey Bluff Lighthouse was established in 1889 and is built of bricks on a stone base. Work on the lighthouse started on October 16 1888, and was completed almost 12 months later on May 28 1889. The original Chance Bros. 4th order dioptric lens was first lit on 2nd August 1889, and used kerosene. The first lighthouse keeper was Mr W. Jacques, transferred from Swan Island. A second house was later built for the assistant keeper. The original lighthouse in 1889 replaced a succession of beacons and obelisks that had formerly stood on the site. It also replaced the earlier Don River light.  In 1910 the original kerosene lamp was converted to acetylene gas which was supplied by a Colt seven-day acetylene generator.

The light was converted to DC electric operation in 1920 and de-manned at the same time. The Lighthouse was converted to hydro electricity with gas standby in 1952, and a 2nd order (700mm) fixed lens was installed. The keepers’ houses were let to local tenants until they were demolished in 1966. In 1978 it was further converted to all electric operation. The lighthouse stands on top of the bluff to western side of the mouth of the Mersey River in Tasmania north of the Port of Devonport.  The establishment of the lighthouse ended a history of wrecks in this area.  The Commonwealth assumed responsibility for the lighthouse under the Commonwealth Lighthouse Act in 1915.  Four vertical red stripers were painted to the lighthouse in 1929 giving it its distinctive and memorable appearance.  It is unusual for an Australian lighthouse to have vertical stripes in its day mark.  Another unusual feature of this light-station is that it was connected to town water in 1901.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

With distinctive four vertical red stripes, Mersey Bluff Lighthouse stands on north-western corner of the Mersey River mouth facing the Bass Strait, by Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images of MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ at George Washington Bridge and Manhattan, NY

Images of MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ Sailing under the George Washington Bridge
Products & Chemicals IMO II/III Tanker of 50,000 dwt built in 2016

VESSEL IDENTIFICATION & DESCRIPTION: Launch Name was Hafnia Lise. Call Sign 9HA4202, IMO Number 9726621. Built at GSI Liwan in 2016, Malta Flagged, Length Overall of 183.20 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 178.50 m., Draught of 12.85 m., Moulded Depth of 18.20 m., Beam of 32.25 m., 55.00 Tonnes per Centimeter Immersion, Gross Tonnage of 29,715, Tonnage of 30,060 Panama Canal Net, 26,140 Suez Canal Net, 14,550 International Net, 10,920 Light Displacement and 49,210 Dwt (long).

VESSEL’S OWNERS / MANAGERS: Hafnia Management AS (Hafnia Tankers), Denmark.  Technical Manager: Thome Ship Management Pte Ltd, Singapore. Registered Owner: Hafnia Tankers Shipholding Malta Ltd.

CARGO HANDLING DETAILS: Cargo Capacity of 46,390 cu.m., Segregated Ballast Tanks, 10 Tanks, Epoxy Tank Coating, IMO Class 2, IMO Class 3, Heat Exchangers, Maximum heating capacity of 60 degrees Celsius, 6 Cargo Separations, 6 Cargo Manifolds, Closed Loading System, 12 Deepwell Pump(s), Carbon Steel cargo lines, Crude Oil Washing.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        MAIN ENGINE & PROPULSION:

MAIN ENGINE: 1 x Diesel – MAN B. & W. 6S50ME-B9.3 – 2-stroke 6-cyl. 500mm x2214mm bore/stroke 10,680mkW total at 117rpm.

AUXILIARY: 3 x Aux. Diesel Gen – Daihatsu 6DK-20e – 4-stroke 6-cyl. 200mm x 300mm bore/stroke 3,120mkW total at 900rpm driving 3 x AC generator(s) at 2,880ekW total, (3,600kVA total) at 60Hz, 1 x Emergency Diesel Gen. – Cummins Inc 6CT8.3-D(M) – 4-stroke 6-cyl. 114mm x 135mm bore/stroke 140mkW total at 1,800rpm driving 1 x AC generator(s) at 60Hz. 1 x Boiler, Oil/Gas fired – Alfa Laval – Aalborg™ OL, 1 x Boiler, Composite – Alfa Laval Aalborg™ OC, 1 x Screw Shaft.

PROPULSION: 1 x FP Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical), 117rpm.

ENVIRONMENTAL EQUIPMENT: 2 x BWTS – Ballast Water Treatment System – Qingdao Headway HMT-800, 1 x BWTS – Ballast Water Treatment System – Qingdao Headway HMT-200.

LIFTING EQUIPMENT: 1 x Crane SWL 10 tons, No Cargo Gear.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Seen here at George Washington Bridge (connecting NJ to Manhattan/NY). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Seen here at George Washington Bridge (connecting NJ to Manhattan/NY). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Seen here at George Washington Bridge (connecting NJ to Manhattan/NY). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Seen here at George Washington Bridge (connecting NJ to Manhattan/NY). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Seen here at George Washington Bridge (connecting NJ to Manhattan/NY). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Seen here at George Washington Bridge (connecting NJ to Manhattan/NY). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Seen here at George Washington Bridge (connecting NJ to Manhattan/NY). Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Starboard bow detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Starboard stern detail. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Manhattan skyline in the background. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Manhattan skyline in the background. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Manhattan skyline in the background. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Manhattan skyline in the background. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

Built in 2016 at GSI, IMO II/III tanker MT ‘Hafnia Lise’ sailing downstream Hudson River. Manhattan skyline in the background. Image credit: Karatzas Images.

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images from a trip to the Republic of the Marshall Islands (a)

Having Found Paradise on Earth!

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

An atoll, lots of palm trees, and turquoise waters! What more paradise has to offer? Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

Images of IMO II Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ in the Houston Ship Channel

Images of MT ‘Bow Elm’ Sailing Downstream in the Houston Ship Channel
Chemicals / Products Tanker 46,000 DWT, built in 2011

VESSEL IDENTIFICATION & DESCRIPTION: Launch Name was Bow Elm. Handy Tanker, Call Sign 9V9233, IMO Number 9388302. Built at SLS Shipbuilding, Double Hull, Singapore Flagged, IMO II, DNV GL Classed, Length Overall of 182.90 m., Length Between Perpendiculars of 175.60 m., Draught of 12.00 m., Moulded Depth of 16.05 m., Beam of 32.20 m., 52.20 Tonnes per Centimeter Immersion, Gross Tonnage of 26,300, Tonnage of 13,087 Suez Canal Net, 14,416 International Net, 11,223 Light Displacement and 45,370 Dwt (long).

VESSEL’S OWNERS & MANAGERS: Odfjell ASA, Bergen, Norway. Technical Manager: Odfjell Ship Management Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Registered Owner: Odfjell Asia II Pte. Ltd. Detailed description from the Owner’s website can be accessed by clicking here!

CARGO HANDLING DETAILS: Cargo Capacity of 47,500 cu.m., Segregated Ballast Tanks, 29 Tanks, 29 Cargo Separations, 29 Cargo Manifolds, Stern Discharge, 29 Centrifugal Pumps with a total Capacity of 8,340 cu.m., S/Steel cargo lines., Cargo connections have diameters of 8, 6 and 4 inches, Manifold height above deck of 2.30 m., Distance from bow to centre manifold is 90.70 m., Epoxy Tank Coating, Zinc Tank Coating, IMO Class 2, Heating Coils, 29 Cargo Separations.

POWER GENERATION & PROPULSION:
MAIN ENGINE: 1 x Diesel – MAN B. & W. 5S60MC-C7.2 – 2-stroke 5-cyl. 600mm x2400mm bore/stroke 11,300mkW total at 105rpm. peed of 15.00 kts, Heavy Fuel Oil, Horsepower of 15,400.

AUXILIARIES: 3 x Aux. Diesel Gen – Yanmar 8N21AL-EV – 4-stroke 8-cyl. 210mm x 290mm bore/stroke 3,900mkW total at 1,000rpm driving 3 x AC generator(s) at 50Hz, 1 x Emergency Diesel Gen. – Cummins Inc NTA855-D(M) – 4-stroke 6-cyl. 140mm x 152mm bore/stroke 287mkW total at 1,800rpm driving 1 x AC generator(s) at 60Hz.

PROPULSOR: 1 x FP Propeller (Aft Centre) (mechanical), Silla Metal, 105rpm.

POS, PROPULSOR: 1 x Pos, Tunnel Thruster (Fwd.) (electric), KaMeWa TT1850 DP, 290rpm, Ø1.75m at 800ekW total AC.

Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Starboard bow detail. Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Amidships detail with manifold for 29 tanks/ segregations / pumps dominating the deck. Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Starboard bow detail. Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Starboard stern and accommodation detail. Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Starboard stern and accommodation detail. Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

Distinctively painted and named, IMO II, Zinc coated Chemicals Tanker MT ‘Bow Elm’ sailing downstream the Houston Ship Channel. Image credit: Karatzas Images

© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS:  Vessel description is provided in good faith and is believed to be correct and accurate but no assurances, warranties or representations are made herewith. Vessel description is provided for entertainment  purposes only. We have no responsibility whatsoever for any errors / omissions in vessel description.

Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

ELMIS